Sunday, March 27, 2011

Some exterior photos of the new boat

I'm posting some photos of the exterior of Adagio now. 

Starting with the bottom, you can see that this boat has a substantial keel.  The keel extends far below the props and rudder to offer protection during a grounding or hitting a log.  This deep and long keel contributes to the boats ability to track staight and true even in heavy following seas.  A boat without a keel like this is very difficult to steer in certain sea conditions.  The Hatteras is said to "track like it's on rail" in just about any sea condition.

Deep keel that protects the props and rudders.


Also notice how the hull goes from a rounded chine to a squared off chine at the very stern.  The chine is where the hull makes the turn from the side to the bottom.   Some boats have an abrupt edge here, some have a smooth rounded transition (like a sailboat).  This squared off section "stiffens" the hull and reduces side to side rolling.  This is a fairly "soft" boat however, which contributes to seaworthiness because the rolling is less abrupt.  Stiff hulls have a more abrupt or snappy roll, but roll less (in total amount of lean).  This tends to throw people about the interior leading to injuries.  Soft hulls roll further but offer a smoother action.  The boat moves around more but it is generally considered to be more tolerable for people over long distances.



The rounded hull.  Much like a sailboat.
 Next is the swimstep.  This is a traditional teak swimstep.  It looks like a lot of maintenance to me!  I'd rather have an all fiberglass swimstep, but every 48LRC came with one like this.


The teak swimstep.  This will take a lot of maintenance to keep it looking good.
This boat has a full width salon which makes walking around the sides of the boat a little awkward.  While you gain a lot of interior space with this arrangement you give up the security of a true walkway along the side(s) of the boat.  Personally I'd rather have the interior space; you only have to go down the sides occasionally but you are inside the boat all the time.

Here's the side of the pilothouse and the narrow walkaround along the outside of the salon.  This walkaround is almost exactly like on our last boat.  Usable, but only in fair conditions.  Here you can see the side door on the pilothouse and the steps that lead to the boat-deck and the flybridge.

The pilothouse door and steps to the flybridge/boat-deck
Here's a view of the flybridge from the very aft end of the boat-deck.  Just this side of Phil (the broker that sold the boat, he's driving it) is a bench seat that will accommodate 4 or 5 people.  There are also two "captains' chairs just ahead of the bench seat.

The boat deck and flybridge
Here's a view of the boat-deck and part of the bench seat on the flybridge.

The bench seat on the flybridge


The boat deck.  There is a lot of open space up here!
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On the bow of the boat, just below the pilothouse windshield is another seating area.  This is a nice adult sized bench seat with a real seat back.  For those of you that remember our Bayliner 45, it too had a seat up here but it was very low and the seat back only came up about 8".  It really wasn't very comfortable, or usable.

The seat on the bow.  There is storage under the seat and behind it.  Nice.

 Finally here is the view of the bow from the edge of the pilothouse.  That raised section is an "escape hatch" for the forward vee-berth should the interior hallway/stairs be unsafe (as in fire).  It's also great for ventilation, or even sitting on.  The bow is nice and large, and with the raised edge it will provide a pretty safe place for our kids to play while at anchor.  Under that canvas is a beautiful teak rail.

The bow.  Huge anchor windlass that could lift a HUGE anchor & lots of chain.
That's about it for the tour of our new boat, "Adagio".  When we get it back up here you are welcome to come take a real tour anytime you want.... !!!

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